Sacramento Baroque Soloists

Imagine yourself on a cold wintry night being transported back in time to a cozy, candle-lit parlor. Gentlemen play whist, ladies sip tea, and lute and flute musicians perform beloved Christmas carols. Such was the mood evoked by the Sacramento Baroque Soloists in their “Winter’s Eve” program. Over 100 patrons attended the concert held in the intimate sanctuary of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Sacramento. The Sacramento Baroque Soloists, now in its 10th year, was founded by Lisa Marie and Michael Lawson. While the group’s focus is on music from the 17th to the 19th centuries, the “Winter’s Eve” program spanned over 500 years, including works from the Middle Ages, rearranged in baroque style, to contemporary Celtic tunes. Period instruments added an authenticity and unique sound to the program. Cathie Apple brought sparkle and depth to the music with her traverso, a wood baroque flute. Michael Lawson provided a lush sound with his 18th century cello and a theorbo, a very long-necked lute-like instrument. Also contributing greatly to the program were Robin Houston on baroque oboe, Ellen Deffner on harpsichord, Lisa Marie Lawson on a harp and a 1727 violin, Marieke Furnee on violin and Steven Coughran on drums. The program of 18 selections began with sweet strains of Marieke’s violin from the balcony, followed by a procession of musicians to the front of […]

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New Music Teachers’ Association Helps Parents Find Quality, Local Instructors

Sacramento, CA — A new music teachers association based in Sacramento is making it easier for parents and aspiring musicians to locate qualified music education programs in their communities. The North American Music Teachers Association (NAMTA) recently launched an online community dedicated to connecting music students with quality teachers and assisting music teachers with the business side of music education. According to David Terry, a Sacramento resident and president of NAMTA, “Parents and students looking for quality music lessons in their communities enjoy free online access to NAMTA, where they can view our member profiles. One of the things parents appreciate about NAMTA is they can immediately see which music teachers have been background check approved. And that peace of mind is very important in this day and age.” Viewing NAMTA teacher web pages and reviews by current and former students will help parents and students find the instructor’s best suited to meet their specific music education goals and needs. NAMTA supports its members with sophisticated Internet marketing and advertising programs that generate leads for teachers and schools. “Our Members post their personalized web pages on NAMTA’s website, showcasing their music teaching credentials, as well as their specific areas of expertise,” Terry added. Music teachers and schools also display teaching schedules, so parents and students can see when and where lessons are offered. For a […]

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Jazz Appreciation, 2060

             When I was at school at the University of Oregon, I took a lot of classes.  There were history classes, journalism classes, english classes, a lot of political science classes, a few science classes, even an art history class (Chicks, man!).  To be honest, 10+ years removed from the experience, most of them have bled together in my memory.                A few stand out, however.  An astronomy course where in a friend of mine cheated off me on the final and got a better grade.  A sociology course where the professor offered extra credit to students who skipped class to join the WTO riots inSeattle.  A military science course that I took along with a future NFL 1,000-yard rusher and a future NBA slam dunk champion.  We learned to rappel…down the bleachers.               But possibly my single most memorable class at the U of O was an awesome jazz appreciation course I took my sophomore year.  We learned about and listened to jazz greats like Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, Count Basie and many others.                I probably listened to Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue" 50 times that semester, from start to finish.  There is no question that I’m a better man for having done so.                Never has a college course been more aptly named. That semester, I developed a great appreciation for "the […]

Continue reading

Sacramento Baroque Soloists

Imagine yourself on a cold wintry night being transported back in time to a cozy, candle-lit parlor. Gentlemen play whist, ladies sip tea, and lute and flute musicians perform beloved Christmas carols. Such was the mood evoked by the Sacramento Baroque Soloists in their “Winter’s Eve” program. Over 100 patrons attended the concert held in the intimate sanctuary of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Sacramento. The Sacramento Baroque Soloists, now in its 10th year, was founded by Lisa Marie and Michael Lawson. While the group’s focus is on music from the 17th to the 19th centuries, the “Winter’s Eve” program spanned over 500 years, including works from the Middle Ages, rearranged in baroque style, to contemporary Celtic tunes. Period instruments added an authenticity and unique sound to the program. Cathie Apple brought sparkle and depth to the music with her traverso, a wood baroque flute. Michael Lawson provided a lush sound with his 18th century cello and a theorbo, a very long-necked lute-like instrument. Also contributing greatly to the program were Robin Houston on baroque oboe, Ellen Deffner on harpsichord, Lisa Marie Lawson on a harp and a 1727 violin, Marieke Furnee on violin and Steven Coughran on drums. The program of 18 selections began with sweet strains of Marieke’s violin from the balcony, followed by a procession of musicians to the front of […]

continue reading

New Music Teachers’ Association Helps Parents Find Quality, Local Instructors

Sacramento, CA — A new music teachers association based in Sacramento is making it easier for parents and aspiring musicians to locate qualified music education programs in their communities. The North American Music Teachers Association (NAMTA) recently launched an online community dedicated to connecting music students with quality teachers and assisting music teachers with the business side of music education. According to David Terry, a Sacramento resident and president of NAMTA, “Parents and students looking for quality music lessons in their communities enjoy free online access to NAMTA, where they can view our member profiles. One of the things parents appreciate about NAMTA is they can immediately see which music teachers have been background check approved. And that peace of mind is very important in this day and age.” Viewing NAMTA teacher web pages and reviews by current and former students will help parents and students find the instructor’s best suited to meet their specific music education goals and needs. NAMTA supports its members with sophisticated Internet marketing and advertising programs that generate leads for teachers and schools. “Our Members post their personalized web pages on NAMTA’s website, showcasing their music teaching credentials, as well as their specific areas of expertise,” Terry added. Music teachers and schools also display teaching schedules, so parents and students can see when and where lessons are offered. For a […]

continue reading

Jazz Appreciation, 2060

             When I was at school at the University of Oregon, I took a lot of classes.  There were history classes, journalism classes, english classes, a lot of political science classes, a few science classes, even an art history class (Chicks, man!).  To be honest, 10+ years removed from the experience, most of them have bled together in my memory.                A few stand out, however.  An astronomy course where in a friend of mine cheated off me on the final and got a better grade.  A sociology course where the professor offered extra credit to students who skipped class to join the WTO riots inSeattle.  A military science course that I took along with a future NFL 1,000-yard rusher and a future NBA slam dunk champion.  We learned to rappel…down the bleachers.               But possibly my single most memorable class at the U of O was an awesome jazz appreciation course I took my sophomore year.  We learned about and listened to jazz greats like Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, Count Basie and many others.                I probably listened to Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue" 50 times that semester, from start to finish.  There is no question that I’m a better man for having done so.                Never has a college course been more aptly named. That semester, I developed a great appreciation for "the […]

continue reading