Indian relics, native voices shine at California Museum

Rare artifacts will be unveiled this month in a new exhibit documenting the culture and contributions of California’s first people at the California Museum in Sacramento. A huge stuffed condor from the Smithsonian, Modoc chief Captain Jack’s buckskin jacket and a cape and arrowhead that belonged to Ishi, reputedly the last Native American to live a primitive life in California, will be showcased in "California Indians: Making A Difference," which opens March 31. "We have some objects that have never been on exhibit before," said curator P. Christiaan Klieger, an anthropologist affiliated with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. "It’s not your typical sort of basket exhibit at all." However, old and new baskets will be among the items on exhibit because California Indian basketweavers are recognized as some of the best weavers in the world. The exhibit includes what anthropologists have described as one of the finest baskets ever made – a 101-year-old basket made by a Washoe weaver named Dat So La Lee (also spelled Datso Lalee), who died in 1929, he said. The exhibit will use more than 400 artifacts, photos, art, documents and multimedia presentations to tell stories of the peoples’ early life, survival, adaptation and resilience. The displays include contemporary paintings by artists such as Frank La Pena, a local Wintu, and botanical specimens of foods still eaten […]

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Indian relics, native voices shine at California Museum

Rare artifacts will be unveiled this month in a new exhibit documenting the culture and contributions of California’s first people at the California Museum in Sacramento. A huge stuffed condor from the Smithsonian, Modoc chief Captain Jack’s buckskin jacket and a cape and arrowhead that belonged to Ishi, reputedly the last Native American to live a primitive life in California, will be showcased in "California Indians: Making A Difference," which opens March 31. "We have some objects that have never been on exhibit before," said curator P. Christiaan Klieger, an anthropologist affiliated with the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. "It’s not your typical sort of basket exhibit at all." However, old and new baskets will be among the items on exhibit because California Indian basketweavers are recognized as some of the best weavers in the world. The exhibit includes what anthropologists have described as one of the finest baskets ever made – a 101-year-old basket made by a Washoe weaver named Dat So La Lee (also spelled Datso Lalee), who died in 1929, he said. The exhibit will use more than 400 artifacts, photos, art, documents and multimedia presentations to tell stories of the peoples’ early life, survival, adaptation and resilience. The displays include contemporary paintings by artists such as Frank La Pena, a local Wintu, and botanical specimens of foods still eaten […]

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