Hunger Action Day: Photos

Hunger action day was held Wednesday May 22 at the state Capital. The day was a focused effort to promote and publicize bills AB 5, SB 283, AB 309, AB 191, and SB 134 at the legislature and with the public. Here is a quick summary of the bills. AB 5 – Homeless Person’s Bill of Rights SB 283 – Reentry and Job Support (for released prison inmates) AB 309 – CalFresh benefits for unaccompanied homeless youth AB 191 – Strengthening the connection between CalFresh and Medi-Cal SB 134 – No Hunger for Heroes Act James Kinchen and Tim Shadix, policy associate for the California Association of Food Banks. James related to me his story and how SB 283 would help inmates returning to society. In particular access to basic needs such as Calfresh and Calworks would encourage them to be productive members of society. Amanda Lasik and Peggy Hannagan provided me with an overview of AB 309 and its importance to the health and wellbeing of unaccompanied homeless youth. Frank Tamborello, planning director for the Day of Hunger event. Assemblyman Tom Ammiano spoke in support of the efforts of the Day of Hunger with specific focus on AB 5. The crowd supporting the assemblyman’s remarks. Assemblyman Tom Ammiano greets one of the people in attendance.   Two anecdotes describing the real world difficulties of […]

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Bikers rally at the Capitol

  Two bills were on bikers’ minds Monday as they rallied at the Capitol. Hundreds of California motorcyclists, drivers and passengers, showed up for the yearly motorcycle rally sponsored by the American Brotherhood Aimed Towards Education (ABATE) Monday morning. They gathered on the Capitol building’s south-side in support of two bills that would change the state’s helmet law and throw out the motorcycle-only checkpoints. Legislators were scheduled to vote Monday afternoon after rally.  For results, CLICK HERE>>>

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‘Occupy’ group stops at Bureau of Indian Affairs on march to Capitol

‘Occupy’ protesters in Sacramento marched on Capital Mall Friday afternoon with a stop at the Bureau of Indian Affairs at 650 Capital Mall with some definite opinions of Columbus and the recent celebration of Columbus Day. After their brief stop and rally at John E. Moss Building, they continued east on Capital Mall where they rallied again on the north steps of the Capital Building See video from demonstration>> View some other ‘Occupy’ articles on SacPress>>      

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Brulte, Do you remember our visit to the Capitol?

My close parent once suggested that I attend the California State Capitol Museum tour, because I was so obviously enamored with political pluralism. Eccentric and famous because I was republican, I resolved to complete a dream in a cup of brew. There before the mainstream again was a ambassador and mutual supporter seeking the approval of the pub Rubicon and its web address. Fortunately, the California State Capitol Museum has made assessable to me and your public, local tours. And its free admission 10:00am-4:00pm Monday thru Sunday isn’t a bad choice. Beginning out of the basement in room B-27 is your ease of tour reservation. One does suppose, there are different reasons we are interested in touring the Capitol; to witness the modern law making process, see new exhibits throughout the year, to woe and cheer over the architecture and neoclassical style, and to appreciate the antique furnishings that make us so fashionably patriotic. The Roman Corinthian style began in 1860 and ended in 1874 at the cost of $245 million. I myself was interested in the deliberative body of the great senatorial congress. And was foolishly close to sit in on around a session as they began their role call and public counter voting for an bill which was approved by their assembly representatives. My father was a bit mainstream and would bring lessons […]

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A man called Moonbeam.

"Noon-2 p.m.: A "people's party" with free hot dogs will be held at the Capitol Northwest lawn; (Jerry) Brown will speak." Steven Harmon, San Jose Mercury News, 1/3/11  As a political science major, a former intern at one of Washington D.C.'s most influential think tanks, and an all around amateur politico, I was very tempted to go to "The People's Inauguration Party 2011" to see Jerry Brown speak.  I'm tempted to do lots of things.  As a broke fat kid, I actually went to "The People's Inauguration Party 2011" to eat free hot dogs.  I kept a running diary of my experiences thereat:  11:50 AM- I arrived at the Capitol and immediately located the line for the free hot dogs. It was probably 150 yards long, beginning at the party tent on the Northwest steps and winding itself nearly all the way to the West lawn.  11:55 AM- I found my way to the end of said line, and jumped in. The line was moving briskly, and populated with exceedingly upbeat folks from nearly all walks of life. I say nearly all because there was one group that was conspicuously absent: the (apparently) homeless. I saw nary a one. At a downtown event, offering free food to "everyone". I'm not sure how they pulled that off. (busing?)  12:00 PM- The seven-piece mariachi band that had been […]

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Through the Looking Glass. . .

  "Don’t forget your pitchfork!" – a friends response when informed that I would be attending a Tea Party.        Over the past year, I have heard a lot about the Tea Party movement, much of it negative, some positive. I do, from time to time, listen to conservative talk radio.             The Tea Party bashers would have you believe that these events are akin to that very famous tea party in "Alice in Wonderland." I’m talking about the cartoon classic here, not the Tim Burton rehash.  A few irrationally fearful lunatics, totally out of touch with reality, brought together by nonsense: "Unbirthdays" in one, "America’s rapid deterioration into a Marxist state" in the other.  And the Tea Partyers’ solutions to the "problems"? Cutting government tenfold, ending federal income tax? Why, that’s like fixing a watch by taking the wheels out and replacing them with butter, jam, sugar and tea. But never mustard, don’t let’s be silly!   Of course the Tea Party supporters harken back to that other famous tea party, the one that took place in Boston some 230-odd years ago.  A bunch of educated patriots, including some of the greatest men of their time, lashing out against an unjust and tyrannical government.  Back then, it was Sam Adams and Paul Revere leading colonists (many dressed as Indians) in revolt against King George and the British […]

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Unique elementary school in South Sacramento to celebrate the winter season

One of the best kept secrets of the South Sacramento area is a small, private school tucked away in the Lanai Shopping Center on Freeport Boulevard, neighboring the Sacramento Executive Airport, where it has existed in rented space for 21 years. Over the years, most of the shopping center tenants have moved away. Meanwhile, countless hours of parent, teacher and student work have gone into transforming a run-down property into a school with colorful classrooms and playgrounds. It has an understated entrance, but Camellia Waldorf School is an oasis for children. The kindergarten yard is home to Mr. Mountain, a big pile of dirt, and Ms. Sandy, a big pile of sand. There are climbing structures in trees, hay bales, a water pump, chickens and a garden of oak and fruit trees, flowers and vegetables. Young children run, jump, play and are close to the elements. Walking down the central corridor, a visitor may hear music, singing or poetry being recited. Watercolor paintings line office windows. The community at Camellia Waldorf School is a diverse group, including families from Sacramento, West Sacramento, Elk Grove, Carmichael and Rancho Cordova. Parents are engineers, pastors, attorneys, health practitioners and public school teachers. Many parents work for the government (federal, state and local), and in a variety of occupations. Families are from a wide range of social, economic, cultural […]

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Confused Demonstartors

Sacramento, CA Friday, May 1, 2009 Several Sacramento Police officers formed a blockade at the front entrance of the Five Fifty Five building on Capitol Mall today as demonstrators gathered to let their voice be heard by Bank of America officials. The downtown branch of Bank of America is located on the ground floor of the Five Fifty Five building. Bank personnel guarded the back ally entrance to be sure that those entering were there for bank business and not part of the demonstration. At this location the demonstrators were voicing their opinion of alleged misuse of bailout funds handed to the banks, and calling for the CEO of BofA to step down. When we attempted to question bank officials, we were met across the board with “no comment”. Demonstrators dispersed peacefully and continued marching down Capitol Mall under police escort to the sidewalk in front of the Capital on the West side. We took this opportunity to talk with demonstrators. As we inquired as to the purpose of their demonstration, there seemed to be a bit of confusion; it seamed each demonstrator we talked with had a different mission for being there. We did finally discover that the main purpose of the protest was for laborers’ rights and that these protest were taking place in several locations throughout California. We caught up with Albert […]

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